Thoughts for Friday

It’s been a while since my last post, not for lack of writing material – no, quite a lot has happened lately!  But for lack of inspiration.  Now I am inspired doubly but can’t remember the second thing I was inspired to write about (stupid dysautonomia brain!).

Today I have something sad to write about, something I didn’t really think would happen to be honest but I guess I always knew the possibility was there.  Any chronic medical condition has its complications and challenges in ways mental, physical and emotional and its important to keep going despite all this but then there are the events that shake you to the core and send shivers down your spine.  Recently the dysautonomia community was shocked by the death of one of our own.  Taken way before her time by complications of a condition not generally believed to be fatal she was by all accounts a loving, generous and inspirational person.  Our thoughts go out to her family and friends.

I did not know her personally but the messages of love and grief from people whose lives she touched around the world are heart-breakingly beautiful and help portray the image of a strong and caring woman who refused to let her illness rule the way she lived her life.  She will be greatly missed.

I was further saddened to hear that she is by no means the first to pass away from complications related to dysautonomia, not even the first this year.  There are different types of dysautonomia that stem from different causes and have a variety of symptoms but the common trend is that the heart’s function is affected in some way.  Whatever the diagnosis is, POTS, NCS, OI, IST – whether it is low or high blood pressure, tachycardia or other irregular heart rate the heart is involved as part of the dysfunctioning autonomic nervous system response and has to work harder than normal.  Our hearts were not made to run marathons without the rest of our bodies participating – it’s no wonder we feel dreadful when it happens.  Don’t get me wrong, I would actually love to be able to run a marathon but I would like my entire body to actively participate at once – imagine if your legs did it by themselves, or your lungs, that would be a bit odd right?  Well why do so many people, health professional and lay-person alike, think it can’t be such a bad thing for our hearts to do it?

Now this condition (or group of conditions) is becoming a bit more widely acknowledged we are starting to see more results; new studies into causes and treatments, new treatments made available, word of mouth from others in the same position but for some this is, sadly, too late.  Who knows how many people have died from dysautonomia-related causes, we will probably never know.  We’re told repeatedly that it could be worse, we could have cancer, we could be terminal – all we ask is to be taken seriously.  It doesn’t take much out of your busy day to look up what dysautonomia is or be a little sympathetic, a little insight and compassion goes a long way.

And here’s a little something to help with the insight 🙂

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